#Music | ‘Help Us Stranger’ Singles

20190516 HMS Premiere
Photo Credit: Yasuhiko Shimizu

So far, The Raconteurs have released four singles from their newest album Help Us Stranger. Three of them have official music videos. They are included below in order of their release.

From The Raconteurs Official YouTube Channel

“Now That You’re Gone” / Dikayl Rimmasch

“Sunday Driver” / Steve Sebring

“Hey Gyp (Dig the Slowness)” / Official Audio

“Help Me Stranger” / Yasuhiko Shimizu

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#Music | Scarecrow Electric

 

Order Scarecrow Electric’s new album Fourth DimensionBandcamp page

Instagram has become my new favorite place. Mostly because it’s very image driven, but there’s a whole bunch of other media happening, being created, on that handy little social media site. In a word: music. Lots of it. And when musicians aren’t talking about their music, they are talking about instruments and rigs and pedals–oh my!

But, if I can get back to the point of this post, Scarecrow Electric is a sexy little garage rock duo from sunny Orlando, FL with a big sound, and I am officially in love with their punk rock and heavy blues infused songs. Seriously, I cannot get enough. How they haven’t called security on me yet is something of a miracle. They must think I’ve got nothing else going on in my mind…

And… aside from seeing The Raconteurs in October, and work, of course, I have to admit, I kinda don’t.

2019 Second Hand Analog Vinyl
Bandcamp link to digital download of Second Hand Analog

From the Bandcamp site, the band was established in 2016 and consists of:

  • Gio: Drums/Vox
  • Carlos: Vox/Guitar/Keys

Pick up their free download of the single “Just Another Stranger” and check them out on YouTube, Soundcloud, and Spotify!

Check out their kickass lyric video for a recent single (and one of my favorites), “Waiting for a Surprise”:

In Memoriam | Gene Wilder (1933-2016)

Source: Variety

Thank you, Gene, for being a bright light and making us smile. Not only did I enjoy your performances in Willy Wonka and the Chocolate FactoryYoung Frankenstein, and Blazing Saddles, but I really enjoyed your small stint on Will and Grace as Will’s boss Mr. Stein. The world will be a little less bright without you. Gene was 83 and died from complications of Alzheimer’s Disease.

May you be peaceful and happy, wherever you are.

Source: Gene Wilder, ‘Willy Wonka’ Star and Comedic Icon, Dies

The Reading Room | 5 #Books to Binge-Read After Binge-Watching #StrangerThings

Fill your ‘Stranger Things’ void with books!

Did you watch “Stranger Things” on Netflix?  Did you tear through it? Were you left wanting more? Then check out one of these books, sure to leave you riveted. Filled with the supernatural and extraterrestrial, normal people in bizarre circumstances, and a tinge of nostalgia, these books are must reads for anyone looking for stranger things…

I answered yes to all three of The Reading Room‘s questions above, but I’ve only heard of two of these titles–the King novel The Tommyknockers, for one–but I had no idea that John Dies at the End was a book. Whether it started that way or this is a novelization of the film matters not; it looks like I need to be making a trip to the library!

Have you guys seen Stranger Things yet? Did you like it? Do you think this Reading Room list does your feels from the series justice?

TV | The X Files Season 10 Premiere

Source: Fox Broadcasting

I am so excited to have The X Files back in active rotation. Just caught up with the first episode, “My Struggle,” and found it close to form. It generated a lot of new questions, barely answered any old questions, and gave us a whole new revised version of the old conspiracy to theorize about. All I know is I am locked in for the next episode, because I have just got to see how this mini-arc ends.

It was lovely to see Scully and Mulder “back together” and in the most awkward of consequences. They were more often trading barbs than kisses, which I’m okay with either way, but they did a fine job of simply making it feel awkward to watch them together. Again, not a bad thing, they are actors, after all, and it would be awkward to be called by a former boss to find a former lover, who is also a former co-worker, wouldn’t it? And, then, after more than a decade, hang out like it’s old times? Yep, definitely awkward.

We also get to see Skinner and the Cigarette-Smoking Man. Sans awkwardness, but with heated exchanges and statements of the obvious, respectively. And then there’s Joel McHale, playing buddy believer with Mulder, as a conservative TV host, who the New York Times felt was miscast here. But I thought he brought just enough energy, zeal, and overt seriousness (I mean, sometimes it felt like he was just trying too hard there.) to bring that character to life. It just reminds me that I need to start watching Community.

Overall, I was pleased, and I’m looking forward to where this little reboot takes us.

Pop | Tarantino Gets Star on Hollywood Walk of Fame

Source: USA Today

Congratulations to Quentin Tarantino!! I have been a big fan of his movies since Reservoir Dogs and Pulp Fiction. I love how he tells a story, the actors he works with, and his dialogue is always intelligent and engaging. I haven’t seen a Tarantino film that I didn’t like. Pure entertainment, and well earned! Congrats to the folks who joined him in the “Class of 2016”. Click the image to see the entire USA Today article.

Love his quote:

“That’s really cool, I must have become a big shot,” he joked during his speech. “This is a real, real groovy day.”

Books | The Bazaar of Bad Dreams from #StephenKing

Source: Simon & Schuster

Simon & Schuster just sent along some information on Stephen King‘s newest short story collection. Here’s what they had to say about it. Certainly can’t wait to dig my claws into it!

A master storyteller at his best—the O. Henry Prize winner Stephen King delivers a generous collection of stories, several of them brand-new, featuring revelatory autobiographical comments on when, why, and how he came to write (or rewrite) each story.

Since his first collection, Nightshift, published thirty-five years ago, Stephen King has dazzled readers with his genius as a writer of short fiction. In this new collection he assembles, for the first time, recent stories that have never been published in a book. He introduces each with a passage about its origins or his motivations for writing it.

There are thrilling connections between stories; themes of morality, the afterlife, guilt, what we would do differently if we could see into the future or correct the mistakes of the past. “Afterlife” is about a man who died of colon cancer and keeps reliving the same life, repeating his mistakes over and over again. Several stories feature characters at the end of life, revisiting their crimes and misdemeanors. Other stories address what happens when someone discovers that he has supernatural powers—the columnist who kills people by writing their obituaries in “Obits;” the old judge in “The Dune” who, as a boy, canoed to a deserted island and saw names written in the sand, the names of people who then died in freak accidents. In “Morality,” King looks at how a marriage and two lives fall apart after the wife and husband enter into what seems, at first, a devil’s pact they can win.

Magnificent, eerie, utterly compelling, these stories comprise one of King’s finest gifts to his constant reader—“I made them especially for you,” says King. “Feel free to examine them, but please be careful. The best of them have teeth.”